US Congress Roundtable on de-risking in the Caribbean hailed a success

first_img Jul 3, 2020 PM Gonsalves Praises CARICOM Achievements, says Challenges… Oct 9, 2020 You may be interested in… Antigua and Barbuda Embassy in US Press Release)  Representatives of the governments of the 15-nation Caribbean Community (CARICOM) had a fully-attended Roundtable meeting on Tuesday November 19 with members of the U.S. Congress and senior representatives of major U.S. banks, concerning the effects of de-risking and the withdrawal of correspondent banking relations (CBRs). The Roundtable was first proposed by Antigua and Barbuda’s Prime Minister, Gaston Browne, at last July’s meeting of CARICOM Heads of Government. Since then, Antigua and Barbuda’s Ambassador to the U.S., Sir Ronald Sanders, worked with Congresswoman, Maxine Waters, as Chair of the Committee on Financial Services of the U.S. House of Representatives to make it a reality. Prime Minister of Antigua and Barbuda, the Hon, Gaston Browne (r) and United States Congresswoman, Maxine Waters ‘We Have Done Fairly Well in Containing… Finance Ministers Meet to Refine ‘Single Ambitious Menu’ for… center_img CARIFESTA XV in Antigua and Barbuda postponed to 2022 Sep 9, 2020 Jul 3, 2020 Blacklisting comes under microscope at IntersessionalThe Caribbean Community (CARICOM) continues to intensify its advocacy against the blacklisting of its Member States by the European Union (EU). The EU has used its tax good governance standard to label some Caribbean countries as non-cooperative tax jurisdictions, despite the fact that the countries in question are not designated…February 18, 2020In “31Intersessional”Way forward identified on correspondent banking challenge – PM BrowneThe Conference welcomed the timely and valuable guidance report from the FATF (Financial Action Task Force) and the FSB (Financial Stability Board) which states that “it is important for correspondent institutions to maintain an ongoing and open dialogue with the respondent institution(s), including helping them understand the correspondent’s anti-money laundering/counter…October 31, 2016In “Antigua & Barbuda”Finance sector threat to get regional attentionPlacencia, Belize, 15 Feb, 2016:   Ahead of Monday night’s Opening of the CARICOM Heads of Government Inter-Sessional meeting in Belize,  Finance Ministers are deliberating  this morning on a regional response to a threat to the banking sector in Member States. The issue is the threat to correspondent banking relationships, or…February 15, 2016In “Antigua & Barbuda”Share this on WhatsApp Senior Bankers from six major U.S. Banks and U.S. Congress persons gathered with a delegation representing CARICOM at Capitol Hill in Washington, under the Chairmanship of Congresswoman Waters. The CARICOM team was led by Antigua and Barbuda Prime Minister who is the lead Head of Government on financial matters. Mr Browne told the meeting that the Caribbean and the U.S. have “a mutuality of interests” which necessitated each side displaying active concern about the well-being of the other, including security. In this regard, the Prime Minister argued that the process of de-risking which has led to a withdrawal of relations by some U.S. banks from Caribbean banks, poses a serious threat to the region’s welfare, including its capacity to import goods from the U.S., which totalled over US$13 billion last year, and is set to exceed this figure this year. Representatives of the U.S. banks indicated that they recognise that value of CBRs, not only in financial terms, but in the critical role it plays in global trade, investment and other financial services. They expressed a keen interest in overcoming the challenges posed by a regulatory environment in which banks are conscious, in their decision-making, of the severe penalties for incidents of money laundering and terrorism financing. The banks made a number of helpful proposals for how this issue could be addressed. In response, Prime Minister Brown pointed out that over the last 10 years, US$26 billion has been imposed worldwide as fines for non-compliance with money laundering, but not one bank was located in the Caribbean. U.S. legislators expressed alarm at the effect on the Caribbean of de-risking and the loss of CBRs from U.S. banks as well as the effect on U.S. national security if the situation worsens. The Roundtable reached joint conclusions that the problem has to be tackled urgently and at several levels. All participating groups at the meeting resolved to work on solutions that arose from the discussion. Prime Minister Browne expressed “great satisfaction” with the outcome of the meeting and the obvious commitment of U.S. legislators and the U.S. banks to work with the Caribbean on solutions. The Prime Minister told the meeting that what is required is “to build trust and confidence between correspondent banks in the U.S. and respondent banks in the Caribbean in a transparent relationship”. Congresswoman Waters declared that she and US House Committee on Financial Affairs will remain engaged in the matter and are willing to take actions that may be necessary to preserve the mutual interests of the U.S. and the Caribbean. Caribbean governments were represented by the Prime Minister of Saint Lucia, Allen Chastanet; the Finance Minister of Jamaica, Nigel Clarke, the Attorney-General and Minister of Legal Affairs of Barbados, Dale Marshall; the National Security Minister of Trinidad and Tobago, Stuart Young; and the CARICOM Secretary-General Irwin LaRocque. Share this:PrintTwitterFacebookLinkedInLike this:Like Loading… last_img read more

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Exploring Mysteries Of Living: Behavior And Science

first_imgBy STEPHEN F. LEDOUXA Los Alamos member ofThe International Behaviorology Institute The focus of this column, the natural science of human nature and human behavior that we now call behaviorology, is actually, the science of the behavior of all animals. Later columns consider not only many of the contingency relations that determine behavior, but also the contingency engineering available to help humanity solve its problems.“Contingencies” refer to functional relations between variables, and soon get covered in their own column. Some of the scientific answers that this discipline supplies for some of our ancient questions will also receive coverage in future columns.Consider now the general notion of science, and what is perhaps a most basic and yet seldom acknowledged characteristic of science. This characteristic only began to demand attention in the last several decades, especially with the rise of the natural science of behavior. What is this characteristic? It is behavior itself.The news media keep scientific and engineering developments in the public eye, although sometimes they focus excess attention on occasional disputes, sometimes physical, over who reached some milestone first, or the luckily even more rare occurrence of data faking. Why do such things happen? They happen because they share the fundamental characteristic of all science that demands our attention: Science is behavior.Consider science as behavior more specifically. Science is the work–related thoughts, emotions, feelings and muscle movements, all of which are behaviors, of those whom we call scientists, which includes me and maybe you and also the applied scientists we call engineers. All these behaviors occur under control of the same sorts of “causes,” or more technically, “functional independent variables” that affect the behaviors of everyone else as well, including other animals.Recognizing the nature of science as behavior helps us examine some aspects and constraints, not only of scientific endeavors, but also of any and all human endeavors, from the most mundane to the truly grand.As with all behaving organisms, scientists are organisms whose behavior is entirely natural. That means it is neither magical nor spontaneous. Instead it occurs due to real, measurable variables. Nature contains a wide range of variables that naturally affect behavior in ways that scientific behaviors can discover and apply for humanity’s benefit.Scientific behaviors include analyzing phenomena, experimentally if possible, and both disseminating findings and developing them into practical products or procedures. Scientific behaviors also include respecting naturalism, which is the name of the assumptions behind science, the name of the general philosophy of science of the natural sciences. These assumptions interact with science, including with research methods, in a quality controlling manner.For example, one reason for some interplay, between philosophy of science and research methods, shows up in the assumptions about why variability occurs in experimental data. The term “variability” refers to the fact that repeated measurements of events seldom produce identical data points. The measured amounts vary. Behaviorologists find that different, and unequal, assumptions about the source of the variability tend to come with different methodologies, especially for studying behavior.On the one hand, behaviorologists see some researchers, especially from non–natural disciplines interested in behavior, assuming that observed variability arises from the fanciful and spontaneous actions of some supposed inner agents that they have posited as causing a behavior of concern, for example a psyche. The magical status of the resulting variability prevents access to it. Thus, one cannot reduce this variability.The most commonly accepted method to deal with variability that one cannot reduce involves using a group statistical design of one sort or another. In these methods the mathematical manipulation of the data supposedly spreads out the variability across a large number of randomly selected subjects so that the variability can be “ignored.”On the other hand, for behaviorologists, those putative inner agents cannot be taken as the source of observed variability, because behaviorologists, as natural scientists, cannot grant status to inner agents deemed magical or mystical. This means that variability must stem from something else. Whatever that is, can a different methodology deal with it, perhaps by reducing it? Yes.Starting with their early experimental work in the 1930s, behaviorologists identify a different source for variability, one related to how thoroughly, or not, we exert experimental control over any functional variables related to a behavior under study. We began working with handfuls of subjects, three to six “per experiment.” Actually three subjects would really be three experiments, as we consider the behavior of each subject individually, because the behavior we study is primarily a phenomenon of individual organisms.If our experimental arrangements actually controlled every variable relevant to the behavior of concern, no variability would occur. All the measurements would be the same, and the results would match predictions. But this never really occurs, because we can rarely, if ever, control all the variables. So the measurements always vary and predictions are always off by some amount. These amounts indicate the variability, which we thus see as arising from the effects of the variables over which we did not exert experimental control.This kind of variability is not mysterious. It derives from the incompleteness of our control over functional variables. The variability is larger when we control only a few of the relevant variables, leading to greater measured differences between predictions and outcomes. On the other hand, the variability is smaller when we control more of the relevant variables, leading to smaller measured differences between predictions and outcomes. This means we can reduce variability by taking more of the functional variables into account. Other natural sciences experience similar considerations.Realistically, however, economics must enter this picture, because taking variables into account is expensive, not just in terms of energy and some other resources, but in terms of funding. Generally, the greater the number of variables measured, and either held steady or altered, the higher the associated monetary expenses. As the importance of the experimental question increases, we must bear more of these costs to take more of the relevant variables into account to answer the experimental question more thoroughly.Conversely, for less important questions, with control being costly, we settle for controlling fewer variables and so must tolerate more variability along with associated reductions in the accuracy of prediction, and so on. After all, events are still lawful and orderly. We must, of course, be careful not to let costs determine the importance of the experimental questions. Still, the point is that the source of variability resides in the functional variables that are not taken into account. Said another way, the source of variability resides in the amount of residual ignorance we must tolerate from affording a decreased amount of experimental control over all the variables related to the events under study.How does variability affect the selection of experimental methodology? For behaviorologists, no need exists to smooth out variability from discredited capricious inner agents across subjects in groups. And in any case such group studies tell us little about the behavior of the individuals in those groups; their individual behavior is an important focus.Instead we adopt the methods that most effectively control the most variables affecting a single subject, with three to six subjects studied, thereby providing a  built–in minimal level of replication, reliability, and generality for the results. Since the single–subject designs that we adopted early on meet these requirements quite well, we continue to emphasize them in the natural science of behavior.Mostly through these kinds of methodology, behaviorologists work to discern and apply the variables of which behavior is a function. These variables generally reside in an organism’s species history, personal history, current situation and, particularly for people, the socio–cultural setting, all sources of material for future columns.Writing these columns occurs separately from membership in The International Behaviorology Institute (TIBI, at www.behaviorology.org where you can always find more information and resources). The author is not speaking for TIBI, and the author and TIBI need not be in agreement. TIBI welcomes feedback, members, and donations (501.c.3). Write the author through this paper’s editor at caclark@ladailypost.com  Copyright © 2019 by Stephen F. Ledouxlast_img read more

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Bail Reform Working As Intended … Is Not Cause Of Crime Problem In Albuquerque

first_imgIn a progress report about bail reform, Pepin shared new data compiled by the Judiciary about the pretrial detention of defendants and highlighted a study by University of New Mexico researchers that analyzed nearly 6,400 cases between July 2017 and March 2019 in which defendants charged with felonies were released from custody pending trial. “We all recognize Albuquerque faces a crime problem, but it’s clear from the UNM study that our pretrial release system is not the cause of it,” Pepin said. In Bernalillo County, judges granted 47% of the detention requests made by prosecutors from July 2017 through June 2019. Pepin explained that prosecutors often sought detention of defendants with a low PSA risk score, but they did not seek detention of a large majority of defendants rated as the highest risk. Pretrial release and detention decisions are based on the risks a defendant poses to public safety and of not appearing in court. Defendants can be held in jail pretrial only if prosecutors file a motion in court and prove an individual is so dangerous that nothing other than detention will protect public safety. Risk assessments prepared by the Bernalillo County courts are available to prosecutors and public defenders. Prosecutors also can seek pretrial detention of a defendant at any time, not just at the start of a criminal case after a person is arrested. Changes in the pretrial justice system have provided a better safeguard for our communities, Pepin said, because judges can now legally detain the most dangerous defendants and courts no longer rely on money bail to determine who is released or remains in jail before trial. Pepin said judges have detained more than 1,000 defendants in Bernalillo County, about half of the more than 2,000 defendants statewide who were found to be so dangerous they must stay in jail until trial.  All of these defendants would have been eligible for release before the 2016 constitutional amendment. To provide judges in Bernalillo County with more information for pretrial decisions, courts evaluate defendants to assess the risks of whether they will commit a new crime, commit a new violent crime, or fail to appear for court hearings if released before trial. The risk assessment tool, called the Public Safety Assessment (PSA), was developed by Arnold Ventures. It is used by courts in other jurisdictions across the country. “Contrary to what critics of bail reform would have the public believe, the great majority of defendants are not committing new crimes after being released from jail pending trial,” Pepin told the Courts, Corrections and Justice Committee. SANTA FE ― Voter-approved reforms to New Mexico’s pretrial justice system are not fueling a crime problem in the state’s largest city and instead are working as intended, Administrative Office of the Courts Director Artie Pepin told lawmakers today. No detention motion was filed 79% of the time when a defendant was rated so risky that the PSA recommended pretrial detention. Without a detention motion by prosecutors, Pepin said, judges had no choice under the law but to release about 2,400 defendants in that highest risk category and impose pretrial supervision requirements on those defendants to try to protect the community.  A study released last week by the UNM Institute of Social Research found that more than 4 out of 5 defendants were not arrested for a crime while on pretrial release and 96% percent were not accused of a violent crime.  Pepin cited data from the report showing that of all 6,392 defendants released, only 12 were arrested for a first-degree felony during their release period — a figure that is less than two-tenths of one percent of those released during the 21 months of the UNM study. NMSC News: Courts outside Bernalillo County granted 55% of detention motion from July 2017 through June 2019.last_img read more

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James Russ Elected President Of State Realtors Assoc.

first_imgOther 2020 NMAR Executive Committee members include: President-Elect Danny Wm. Vigil of Albuquerque; Treasurer Wes Graham, Clovis; Immediate Past President Paul Wilson of Albuquerque; Central District Vice President Tim MacEachen, Albuquerque; Northwest District Vice President Julie Blair, Farmington; Southwest District Vice President Sonya Roberts, Alamogordo; Southeast District Vice President Esther, Roswell; and Secretary/CEO, M. Steven Anaya, NMAR in Santa Fe. 2020 officers and directors of the New Mexico Association of REALTORS will be installed January 29 at La Fonda on the Plaza, Santa Fe, as part of NMAR’s Leadership, Legislative, and Business Meetings. James Russ II He has served in many capacities, including as a member of the Executive Committee and Board of Directors of NMAR. Russ will serve on the National Association of REALTORS (NAR) RPAC Participation Council in 2020, and as 2020 state president will serve on NAR’s Board of Directors. James Russ II, broker/owner of Sierra Blanca Realty in Ruidoso, has begun his term as 2020 President of the New Mexico Association of REALTORS (NMAR). Besides his volunteer activities with REALTOR organizations, James is involved in the Ruidoso Affordable Housing Committee, the Lincoln County Road Review Commission, the village of Ruidoso’s keep Ruidoso Beautiful Committee, the Sierra Blanca unit advisory board for the Boys and Girls Club, and the Property Tax Protest Board.center_img To emphasize the unity of REALTORS across New Mexico, James has selected “One Voice One Vision” as his theme for 2020. NMAR News: Russ has more than 20 years of professional real estate service and experience. In 2014 he served as president of the Ruidoso/Lincoln County Association of REALTORS and in 2013 he was named their REALTOR of the Year. The REALTORS® Association of New Mexico is one of the state’s largest trade associations, representing over 6,900 members involved in all aspects of the residential and commercial real estate market.last_img read more

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Letter To The Editor: LA Taxi Provides Needed Service

first_imgBy CAMILLE MORRISONWhite RockI no longer drive so I take LA Taxi to the airport or to doctor’s appointments in Albuquerque.  I take the Rail Runner to Albuquerque when I visit friends. The taxi takes me to the train station in the morning and back home from the train station when I return in the evening.The bus doesn’t run on weekends so I take the taxi when I go someplace that is not within walking distance of my house. Cindy (LA Taxi owner Cindy Capelli) and I have become good friends. She provides a service that is needed in Los Alamos.Take the taxi and leave the driving to Cindy or one of her drivers.last_img read more

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Snyder: A History Of Movie Entertainment In Los Alamos

first_imgLASL Director Norris Bradbury and actress Linda Darnell, 1950. Courtesy/Los Alamos Historical Society ArchivesHill Theatre advertising its screening of ‘Rich, Young and Pretty’. Courtesy/Los Alamos Historical Society ArchivesBy Sharon SnyderLos Alamos Historical SocietyAlong with the recent announcement of the closure of CB Fox, an old photograph of their location on Central Avenue surfaced. Dave Fox sent the picture of the old Hill Theatre to the Historical Society, and it created a curiosity about movie entertainment from the early days of Los Alamos to the present.During the Manhattan Project there were two theaters with the attractive names of Theater No. 1 and Theater No. 2. The smaller Theatre No. 1 was used exclusively for movies, while the larger of the two buildings offered other entertainment options. In addition to a movie screen, there was a stage for plays and space for dances, concerts and conferences. It also held a basketball court and was used for the community school’s physical education.After World War II, Theater No. 1 was renamed The Hill and used as a community theater until July 1, 1950. In 1948 the Centre Theatre had opened with the popular comedy Sitting Pretty starring Clifton Webb, but according to the Los Alamos Herald newspaper, the Atomic Energy Commission felt the need for another “new moving picture house” with the same name as their previous one.A new building project along Central Avenue included “a very modern sleek structure with room for stores on the second floor and to one side of the main entrance.” The second Hill theater opened Aug. 9, 1951, showing Rich, Young, and Pretty with Jane Powell and Wendell Corey. The prices were 39 cents for adults, 25 cents for students, and 10 cents for children. However, the new “modern” theatre had a short run. It closed in 1955 and was remodeled into a department store, eventually to house CB Fox.In the late 80s, the Centre Theatre that had existed for many years between the town’s bowling alley and Pierotti’s Soda Bar was remodeled into a tri-plex and renamed the High Society Cinema. It survived until 2001.Two small theaters vied for success in White Rock in the 1970s. The White Roxy Theatre opened in December 1972 and seated 193 movie goers. Three years later it was sold to new owners and moved up from a 16mm projector to a 35mm in order to increase the selection of films. The closing date for the White Roxy is unknown.After all those years and different establishments, Los Alamos has a fine theatre with a creative name: The Reel Deal! This popular venue is a family-owned movie theater that opened almost two decades ago. It continues a long and interesting tradition of entertainment in our town but watching movies has not been the only way that people in this area have enjoyed the motion picture industry.In recent years a number of movies and television shows have been filmed in and around Los Alamos, but perhaps the first filming to engross our town produced the movie Two Flags West in 1950. It was filmed on San Ildefonso Pueblo and the Shipman Ranch near Black Mesa. The story was set in the West during the Civil War and starred Joseph Cotton, Linda Darnell, Jeff Chandler and Cornel Wilde. A list of names in the cast reveals some interesting connections to Los Alamos and the surrounding area, as extras were pulled from the local population. Allen Church, a former Los Alamos Ranch School student and grandson of Ashley Pond Jr., was one of those extras. He remembered taking part in riding scenes but didn’t ever see the stars. However, if you happened to be the director of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, you weren’t bunched in with the extras. You got to meet the star! In a noted photograph, Norris Bradbury seems quite pleased to be photographed with Linda Darnell.Ah, movies. What a place they hold in our enjoyment of life!The Hill Theatre, c. 1952. Courtesy/Los Alamos Historical Society Archiveslast_img read more

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Posts From The Road: Upper Antelope Canyon

first_imgWind and Water: The beautifully sculpted sandstone walls vary in color depending on how much light reaches the canyon walls. Wind and water formed the canyon and its angled and flowing walls. Photo by Gary Warren/ladailypost.com Curved and Fluid: Another beautiful example of the canyon walls which are unlike anything else on earth. The canyon is breathtaking. Photo by Gary Warren/ladailypost.com Narrow Pathway: Many areas of the short hike in the canyon are a few feet wide but there are narrow pathways in part of the canyon. No climbing or scrambling is required but a larger person may touch both walls when passing through a narrow area. Photo by Gary Warren/ladailypost.com Heart: At one point the canyon walls form the shape of a heart. Photo by Gary Warren/ladailypost.com Entrance: The tour operators transport visitors from Page, Ariz. to the entrance area of Antelope Canyon. We toured the Upper canyon. The entrance to the slot canyon is unassuming but as soon as you enter and round the first bend in the trail, visitors experience the beauty of the canyon. Photo by Gary Warren/ladailypost.com WOW: One of the early views seen by visitors after entering the canyon. This landscape was carved over millions of years by wind and rain. Still today, a close eye is kept on the weather and if thunderstorms are possible, tours are cancelled. Photo by Gary Warren/ladailypost.comBy GARY WARRENPhotographerFormerly of Los AlamosWhile we are all staying at home during the pandemic, the next few Post From the Road will be from previous travels during the last couple of years.Slot canyons are prevalent through the southwest, primarily in Arizona and Utah. Most of the canyons in this region of the country are the work of wind and water flowing through the sandstone landscape forming and carving beautiful red walls.Perhaps the most well known of these canyons is Antelope Canyon just out of Page, Ariz. Antelope consist of two sections, Upper Antelope and Lower Antelope Canyon. Tours are available for both but Upper Antelope Canyon is the most popular and most visited.These pristine canyons are within the Navajo Nation. To enter the area, visitors are required to take a guided tour given by Navajo tour guides.There are several tour companies in the town of Page that offer tours of this and other canyons.Editor’s note: Longtime Los Alamos photographer Gary Warren and his wife Marilyn are traveling around the country and he shares his photographs, which appear in the ‘Posts from the Road’ series published in the Sunday edition of the Los Alamos Daily Post. If Walls Could Talk: These ancient formations must have a story to tell from their years of wind and water blowing and flowing through these walls. Photo by Gary Warren/ladailypost.comlast_img read more

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New Mexico COVID-19 Cases Now At 17,517 With 10 New Deaths And 6,870 Patients Recovered

first_imgSTATE News:SANTA FE – New Mexico state health officials have announced this afternoon 307 additional positive tests for COVID-19.Los Alamos County has two new cases bringing today’s total to 16 cases that have tested positive for COVID-19.Today’s update announces 10 additional deaths reported in New Mexico related to COVID-19.The New Mexico Department of Health reported today the most recent cases: 60 new cases in Bernalillo County11 new cases in Chaves County4 new cases in Cibola County11 new cases in Curry County49 new cases in Doña Ana County9 new cases in Eddy County2 new cases in Grant County2 new cases in Guadalupe County2 new cases in Hidalgo County32 new case in Lea County3 new cases in Lincoln County2 new cases in Los Alamos County10 new cases in Luna County16 new cases in McKinley County7 new cases in Otero County2 new cases in Quay County47 new cases in Rio Arriba County9 new cases in Sandoval County19 new cases in San Juan County6 new cases in Santa Fe County4 new cases in Valencia CountyThe 10 additional deaths in New Mexico reported today include:A female in her 70s from Bernalillo County. The individual was hospitalized and had underlying conditions.A female in her 90s from Cibola County. The individual was hospitalized and had underlying conditions.A female in her 60s from Grant County. The individual was hospitalized and had underlying conditions.A male in his 70s from Lea County. The individual was hospitalized and had underlying conditions.A female in her 50s from Lincoln County. The individual was hospitalized and had underlying conditions.A female in her 40s from McKinley County. The individual was hospitalized and had underlying conditions.A male in his 60s from McKinley County. The individual was hospitalized.A male in his 70s from McKinley County. The individual was hospitalized and had underlying conditions.A female in her 90s from McKinley County. The individual was hospitalized and had underlying conditions.A male in his 70s from Sandoval County. The individual was hospitalized and had underlying conditions.The number of deaths of New Mexico residents related to COVID-19 is now 588.Previously reported numbers included four cases that have been identified as duplicates (one case in Bernalillo County, one case Rio Arriba County, two cases in Santa Fe County) and one case that has been identified as out-of-state resident in Santa Fe County – these have now been corrected. Including the above newly reported cases, New Mexico has now had a total of 17,517 COVID-19 cases:Bernalillo County: 3,920Catron County: 4Chaves County: 223Cibola County: 271Colfax County: 11Curry County: 327Doña Ana County: 1,786Eddy County: 196Grant County: 55Guadalupe County: 26Harding County: 1Hidalgo County: 80Lea County: 411Lincoln County: 41Los Alamos County: 16Luna County: 165McKinley County: 3,783Mora County: 3Otero County: 113Quay County: 26Rio Arriba County: 251Roosevelt County: 92Sandoval County: 942San Juan County: 2,861San Miguel County: 34Santa Fe County: 436Sierra County: 21Socorro County: 67Taos County: 71Torrance County: 51Union County: 14Valencia County: 264County totals are subject to change upon further investigation and determination of residency of individuals positive for COVID-19.The Department of Health currently reports the following numbers of COVID-19 cases among individuals held by federal agencies at the following facilities:Cibola County Correctional Center: 2Otero County Prison Facility: 276Otero County Processing Center: 149Torrance County Detention Facility: 43The Department of Health currently reports the following numbers of COVID-19 cases among individuals held by the New Mexico Corrections Department at the following facilities:Central New Mexico Correctional Facility in Valencia County: 22Northwest New Mexico Correctional Center in Cibola County: 1Otero County Prison Facility: 461Penitentiary of New Mexico in Santa Fe County: 1As of today, there are 154 individuals hospitalized in New Mexico for COVID-19. This number may include individuals who tested positive for COVID-19 out of state but are currently hospitalized in New Mexico. This number does not include New Mexicans who tested positive for COVID-19 and may have been transferred to a hospital out of state.As of today, there are 6,870 COVID-19 cases designated as having recovered by the New Mexico Department of Health.The Department of Health has identified at least one positive COVID-19 case in residents and/or staff in the past 28 days at the following long-term care and acute care facilities:The Adobe in Las CrucesAdvanced Health Care of Albuquerque in AlbuquerqueThe Aristocrat Assisted Living Center in AlamogordoAvamere Rehab at Fiesta Park in AlbuquerqueBear Canyon Rehabilitation Center in AlbuquerqueBeeHive Homes of Farmington in FarmingtonBloomfield Nursing and Rehabilitation in BloomfieldBlue Horizon Assisted Living in Las CrucesBrookdale Juan Tabo Place in AlbuquerqueCamino Healthcare in AlbuquerqueCasa del Sol Center in Las CrucesCasa de Oro Center in Las CrucesCasa Real in Santa FeCedar Ridge Inn in Farmington Crane’s Roost Care Home in AztecDesert Springs Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in HobbsEl Castillo in Santa FeGoodLife Senior Living in CarlsbadGood Samaritan Society in GrantsGood Samaritan Society in Las CrucesLife Care Center of Farmington in FarmingtonMontebello on Academy in AlbuquerqueThe Neighborhood in Rio RanchoNew Mexico State Veterans’ Home in Truth or ConsequencesNorth Ridge Alzheimer’s Special Care Center in AlbuquerquePrinceton Place in AlbuquerqueRed Rocks Care Center in GallupRetirement Ranches, Inc. in ClovisRetreat Healthcare in Rio RanchoThe Rio at Las Estancias in AlbuquerqueRio Rancho Center in Rio RanchoSagecrest Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Las CrucesSandia Ridge Center in AlbuquerqueSombrillo Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Los AlamosSierra Health Care Center, Inc. in Truth or Consequences Spanish Trails Rehabilitation Suites in AlbuquerqueSunset Villa Care Center in RoswellTaos Living Center in TaosThe Village at Northrise in Las CrucesWelbrook Senior Living Las Cruces in Las CrucesWhite Sands Healthcare in HobbsThe Department of Health has detected community spread in the state of New Mexico and is investigating cases with no known exposure. The agency reports that given the infectious nature of the virus it is likely other residents are infected but yet to be tested or confirmed positive. To that end, all New Mexicans have been instructed to stay home except for outings absolutely necessary for health, safety and welfare. These additional restrictions have been enacted to aggressively minimize person-to-person contact and ensure spread is mitigated. New Mexicans are strongly urged to limit travel to only what is necessary for health, safety and welfare.The New Mexico Department of Health has active investigations into the positive patients, which includes contact-tracing and swabs of symptomatic individuals who have had contact with the positive cases.Every New Mexican must work together to stem the spread of COVID-19. Get tested. Stay home, especially if you are sick. Wear a mask or face covering when in public and around others.New Mexicans who report symptoms of COVID-19 infection, such as fever, cough, shortness of breath, chills, repeated shaking with chills, muscle pain, headache, sore throat, and/or loss of taste or smell should call their health care provider or the NMDOH COVID-19 hotline immediately (1-855-600-3453).Thanks to increased statewide testing capacity, the following people may now be considered for COVID-19 testing: Symptomatic people displaying the COVID-19 symptoms of cough, fever, shortness of breath, chills, repeated shaking with chills, muscle pain, headache, sore throat, and/or loss of taste or smell;Asymptomatic people who are close contacts or household members of New Mexico residents who have already tested positive for the coronavirus;Asymptomatic residents in nursing homes;Asymptomatic people in congregate settings such as homeless shelters, group homes, detention centers; andAsymptomatic people who are currently working.New Mexicans who have non-health-related questions or concerns can also call 833-551-0518 or visit newmexico.gov, which is being updated regularly as a one-stop source for information for families, workers and others affected by and seeking more information about COVID-19.last_img read more

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The ratings showdown

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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A tale of two brothers

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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